Logo
camp haven logo

Camp Haven adds new classroom and dining facility

The landscape of Camp Haven’s transitional housing campus has changed drastically in the past few weeks. Gone is the uninhabitable structure that once housed Gordon’s Diner that, in recent years, sat unused. In its place, a recently completed, 1,500-square-foot Multipurpose Services and Programs Building featuring a classroom, warming kitchen, dining area and psychologist’s office.

The landscape of Camp Haven’s transitional housing campus has changed drastically in the past few weeks. Gone is the uninhabitable structure that once housed Gordon’s Diner that, in recent years, sat unused. In its place, a recently completed, 1,500-square-foot Multipurpose Services and Programs Building featuring a classroom, warming kitchen, dining area and psychologist’s office.

“The new building will be a godsend, Camp Haven,” said Gordon Stewart, Camp Haven board member and building project director. “Instead of trying to cram 30 people into a room designed for 10, the new building will provide ample space for residents to meet and dining. As well as for community meetings for up to 45 people.”

Additionally, the multipurpose building will enable Camp Haven to increase the number of at-risk men they can house from 26 to 32.

The capital project was made possible through a two-year interest-free construction loan obtained by the Camp Haven Board of Directors. The plan, set in motion in 2019, was to allow for Camp Haven to raise funds through grants and public fundraising.

Since construction began in January 2020, Camp Haven has been blessed with several major institutional grants from generous philanthropic community supporters, including a $100,000 grant from Impact 100; a $50,000 grant made possible through the Indian River Community Foundation’s Community Enrichment Fund; a John’s Island Foundation grant for $50,000, and a $15,000 grant from the Business for a Better Indian River County Fund.

These grants comprised 80 percent of the building costs. Additional funds to cover the balance of the construction loan will be raised through public outreach to Camp Haven’s longtime friends and donors as soon as current conditions permit.

The generosity of the Vero Beach community has enabled Camp Haven to enrich and expand programs offered to homeless men. The nonprofit has come a long way since its inception to become a place the community can count on to effectively reduce homelessness.

Camp Haven’s mission is to help men who have lost their way learn how to find and keep a job by providing employment training and financial education so they may return to society as contributing members that can take care of themselves in every way.

Additionally, psychological help is provided for all Camp Haven residents and thanks to the new facility, the Camp Haven psychologist will be able to conduct one-on-one meetings in a private space.

“The new building is more than just a structure,” said Chuck Bradley, Camp Haven executive director. “It will truly be the heart and soul of Camp Haven, by providing a space that is conducive for learning to the residents.”

Camp Haven provides transitional housing and education to men committed to rising out of homelessness. Through a thoughtful intake procedure and strict adherence to guidelines, residents in the program receive educational opportunities, counseling, and encouragement as they move from homelessness to hopefulness, eventually becoming active, engaged, contributing members of our community.

“The new building will be a godsend, Camp Haven,” said Gordon Stewart, Camp Haven board member and building project director. “Instead of trying to cram 30 people into a room designed for 10, the new building will provide ample space for residents to meet and dining. As well as for community meetings for up to 45 people.”

Additionally, the multipurpose building will enable Camp Haven to increase the number of at-risk men they can house from 26 to 32.

The capital project was made possible through a two-year interest-free construction loan obtained by the Camp Haven Board of Directors. The plan, set in motion in 2019, was to allow for Camp Haven to raise funds through grants and public fundraising.

Since construction began in January 2020, Camp Haven has been blessed with several major institutional grants from generous philanthropic community supporters, including a $100,000 grant from Impact 100; a $50,000 grant made possible through the Indian River Community Foundation’s Community Enrichment Fund; a John’s Island Foundation grant for $50,000, and a $15,000 grant from the Business for a Better Indian River County Fund.

These grants comprised 80 percent of the building costs. Additional funds to cover the balance of the construction loan will be raised through public outreach to Camp Haven’s longtime friends and donors as soon as current conditions permit.

The generosity of the Vero Beach community has enabled Camp Haven to enrich and expand programs offered to homeless men. The nonprofit has come a long way since its inception to become a place the community can count on to effectively reduce homelessness.

Camp Haven’s mission is to help men who have lost their way learn how to find and keep a job by providing employment training and financial education so they may return to society as contributing members that can take care of themselves in every way.

Additionally, psychological help is provided for all Camp Haven residents and thanks to the new facility, the Camp Haven psychologist will be able to conduct one-on-one meetings in a private space.

“The new building is more than just a structure,” said Chuck Bradley, Camp Haven executive director. “It will truly be the heart and soul of Camp Haven, by providing a space that is conducive for learning to the residents.”

Camp Haven provides transitional housing and education to men committed to rising out of homelessness. Through a thoughtful intake procedure and strict adherence to guidelines, residents in the program receive educational opportunities, counseling, and encouragement as they move from homelessness to hopefulness, eventually becoming active, engaged, contributing members of our community.